Final!

Socrates gets a knitted beard

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Create an animal

Fun!

HTML!

http://digital.mica.edu/ff210_07/vwise/rootdirectory/

Video

 

Animation of excerpt from 100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Photoshop:

Remove an object: Danger

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Banana Smores

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Make a beautiful black and white photo: American Gothic

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Distort/change the shape of something: Abbie

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Composite a figure into a new background: Gingerbread House

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The Social Network

In watching this movie, I feel like I was most opened up to the bureaucracy of the internet, that I hadn’t really thought about before. This is a website that is free for anyone to use, and created for that purpose and yet Mark Zuckerburg was in a lawsuit about who it belonged to. I understand that there’s a lot of work that is put into websites, and that they were making money off the stocks, but it just seems like something that couldn’t belong to any one person.

I also thought this movie made some interesting points about how technology is rapidly changing our culture. The movie is about facebook, but we can recognize that technology before then (they specifically name Napster, and how greatly that changed the music industry) and even more currently (I’m thinking specifically of smart phones) has had a similar effect on our culture. Because of facebook, I know far more about my friends and acquaintances than I would otherwise, especially the ones that live far away. I don’t evennneed to interact or communicate with them in order to know almost anything I would like to.

I remember as I was growing up, and different social/blog type sites were being created and my parents always warned me to be careful about posting private information. I had a xanga, with a false age and a username that I still use today, and had the highest privacy settings the internet afforded me. But I think facebook has almost become a place to post private information about yourself. I have 1,187 photos tagged of myself, and 463 friends. All 463 of those people could, if they so chose, to go through all 1,187 of those pictures, peruse my wall, and learn about practically my whole life, from 9th grade to the present. To me, this would feel like a violation of privacy, even though I’ve posted this information with the knowledge that it becomes public. This leads me to question the unwritten moral code of the internet, and whether or not there is one — which closely relates to the other film we watched, Catfish. I’m still not sure what that code is, but I think I have a sense of what it is, and that at least amongst my generation, this code is similar for everyone.

TED Talks

 

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The first video, with David Byrne (of the Talking Heads) talks about how venues and context have greatly changed music, from churches to casino boats to CBGB and cars. Initially, music was loud, with little change in rhythm, but then grew to have interesting tempos, and vocal accompaniment, with an increased level of noise when the microphone came of use.

What was interesting to me about this video is that music has changed context so frequently. Music was listened to in churches, or played for kings, and then at social events and specifically music venues and now in cars and on MP3 players.

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The second TED talk is with Natalie Jeremijenko, discussing her environmental health clinic. Natalie explains some of the things her clinic has done, such as prescribing pet tadpoles, the “ooz” (a variation of a zoo), and the opportunity to text fish. The clinic was created to raise environmental health awareness, resulting from many medical clinics treating health issues that are directly related to the environment.

My favorite thing that Natalie talked about were fire hydrant gardens in which “impatients” were prescribed to create a garden in the no parking spot in front of fire hydrants. The purpose of this was to help filter the toxins that go into the sewer system from the streets. The plants can still be parked on, they would simply grow back, and it makes use of space that is very rarely used. Natalie described what she was doing as “rescripting interactions to address environment challenges”, which I find to be both true and important in our urban lives.

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